Buzzards head home after Blue Flag 17

Blue Flag 17

An Israeli F-15C Buzz takes off at Uvda Air Force Base, Israel, Nov. 13, during Blue Flag 2017. Throughout the exercise, the eight participating nations worked together to improve cooperation, integration and tactical effectiveness. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Abby L. Finkel)

Blue Flag 17

A F-16C Fighting Falcon assigned to the 31st Fighter Wing, Aviano Air Base, Italy, taxis after landing at Uvda Air Force Base, Israel, Nov. 13, during Blue Flag 17. The goal of Blue Flag is to exercise military partnerships and strategic cooperation. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Abby L. Finkel)

Blue Flag 17

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Jamie N. Cline, 510th Aircraft Maintenance Unit crew chief, waits for her turn to marshal an F-16C Fighting Falcon assigned to the 510th Fighter Squadron, Aviano Air Base, Italy, at Uvda Air Force Base, Israel, Nov. 13, during Blue Flag 17. The U.S. Air Force's participation in the exercise demonstrates our nation's commitment to collective defense. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Abby L. Finkel)

Blue Flag 17

An Israeli F-15C Buzz lands after a morning sortie at Uvda Air Force Base, Israel, Nov. 5, during Blue Flag 2017. The U.S. and Israel share a strong and long-lasting relationship in addition to a close military partnership, and exercises like this further strengthen the relationship of our nations and promote regional peace and stability. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Abby L. Finkel)

Blue Flag 17

U.S. Air Force Airmen from the 31st Fighter Wing, Aviano Air Base, Italy, check the flightline for anything that might damage the jets before the morning sortie at Uvda Air Force Base, Israel, Nov. 8, during Blue Flag 17. The U.S. and Israel's continuing contributions to develop and improve air readiness are significant in maintaining security and building a strong partnership. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Abby L. Finkel)

Blue Flag 17

An F-16C Fighting Falcon assigned to the 31st Fighter Wing, Aviano Air Base, Italy, takes off in support of exercise Blue Flag 17 at Uvda Air Force Base, Israel, Nov. 13. Cooperation between the U.S. and Israel is important to stability in the Middle East and reflects a common understanding of the global security environment. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Abby L. Finkel)

Blue Flag 17

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Jamie N. Cline, 510th Aircraft Maintenance Unit crew chief, marshals an F-16C Fighting Falcon assigned to the 510th Fighter Squadron, Aviano Air Base, Italy, for the first sortie of the day at Uvda Air Force Base, Israel, Nov. 12, during Blue Flag 17. The U.S. and Israel have a strong and enduring military-to-military partnership built on trust and developed over decades of cooperation. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Abby L. Finkel)

UVDA AIR FORCE BASE, Israel -- After two weeks of flying missions, Blue Flag 2017, the third iteration of the Israeli-hosted exercise, wrapped up at Uvda Air Force Base, Israel, Nov. 16.

Participants from seven nations hosted by Israel, including approximately 200 U.S. Air Force Airmen and seven F-16C Fighting Falcons from 31st Fighter Wing in Aviano, Italy, are now headed back to their home stations.

The multinational live-fly exercise, the largest of its kind hosted by Israel, was aimed at strengthening military partnerships and improving strategic communication between the participating nations.

"Anytime we participate in a multinational exercise with many different partners and players, it builds our interoperability," said Brig. Gen. Lance Landrun, 31st Fighter Wing commander. "It builds our ability to communicate, it builds our common understanding of culture and it builds our common understanding of capabilities and tactics."

This strengthening of partner forces didn't just happen in the air--it also happened on the ground and in the planning stages of each sortie.

"What we went for when we designed this exercise was that we wanted to find the common ground for each air force," said an Israeli air force pilot, "which means that when we planned our missions we did it together, and everyone shared their way of how they fight each mission."

This year, Blue Flag participants were able to gain even more insight into how partner nations operate as several new countries, including India, joined the exercise for the first time.

"As a professional force it is our duty to keep improving ourselves," said an Indian air force spokesperson. "Here we saw a lot of countries that have varied combat experience, especially Israel, from which we could learn."

"This is a place we could all learn from each other’s combat experiences," he continued. "We are friends from different countries, learning to operate together."

The U.S. Air Force regularly participates in multinational training exercises and has participated in all three iterations of Israel's Blue Flag. Exercises like this further strengthen the relationships between attending nations and also promote regional peace and security.