COMUSAFE introduces command priorities

U.S. Air Force Gen. Tod D. Wolters, U.S. Air Forces in Europe and U.S. Air Forces Africa commander, speaks to members of the 39th Security Forces Squadron Aug. 31, 2016, at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey. Wolters visited Airmen across the base to meet and speak about the diverse and important missions the base is supporting. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Joshua T. Jasper)

U.S. Air Force Gen. Tod D. Wolters, U.S. Air Forces in Europe and U.S. Air Forces Africa commander, speaks to members of the 39th Security Forces Squadron Aug. 31, 2016, at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey. Wolters visited Airmen across the base to meet and speak about the diverse and important missions the base is supporting. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Joshua T. Jasper)

RAMSTEIN AIR BASE, Germany -- Gen. Tod D. Wolters, U.S. Air Forces in Europe and Air Forces Africa commander, outlined his priorities and focus areas for the command during an interview at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, Oct. 4.

Wolters explained that the best way forward for the command is to focus on three things: trust, teamwork and training.

“We need to instill a high degree of trust, teamwork and training to all of our military members, all of our DOD civilians and the entire security enterprise that supports the region,” Wolters said.

He explained that trust is essential, especially while working with other militaries.

“Trust is important within our own military organizations,” Wolters said, “and certainly with all of our partners and certainly with all of our allies.”

The concept of trust ties in closely with the general’s next priority; teamwork.

“Teamwork is critical to make sure we are taking advantage of what our diverse Air Force can bring to the fight, and what our diverse Air Force can bring to the region here in Europe and in Africa,” Wolters said.

Finally, training is what makes the combination of trust and teamwork successful.

“Training has been the backbone of the Air Force’s success for the last 69 years and what we suspect will be the backbone of success for the far, far future,” Wolters said. “When you train hard you’re confident in what you can do and you feel good about yourself because you know that you can meet the requirements of the combatant commander.”

Wolters said that training isn’t only about being able to provide ready forces to the battlefield, though.

“The other great benefit [of training],” Wolters explained, “is it keep folks that want to contest what you are doing a little further at bay so they are not as motivated to start conflict with an organization that is highly trained.”

The general also explained that the last 24 months in USAFE-AFAFRICA have seen dramatic improvements and he is excited as he looks to the future.

Wolters has a clear vision that will be achieved by the concept of trust, teamwork and training, but he was quick to explain that one key to the command’s success will lie in the U.S. Air Force enlisted force.

“Our enlisted force is as capable as I have ever observed in my 34 years of service,” Wolters said. “What excites me from when I fought in the joint environment and worked as a joint staff officer is the number of non-Airmen who walked up to me to brag about the tremendous capability of our enlisted force. I have had so many senior U.S. Army, Marine and Navy officers comment to me on a U.S. Air Force Airman, and their comment to me is, ‘Your enlisted force is pure gold.’ That makes me proud and I want to push very hard to continue to train, so we can be as respected tomorrow as we are today.”