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RAF Mildenhall hosts master resilience trainer course

Students from the Master Resilience Trainer Course pose for a photo at RAF Mildenhall, England, Feb. 14, 2018.  Sixty U.S. Air Forces in Europe personnel from Stavanger, Norway; Aviano Air Base, Italy; Moron Air Base, Spain; and surrounding bases in the United Kingdom participated in this collaborative workshop. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Benjamin Cooper)

Students from the Master Resilience Trainer Course pose for a photo at RAF Mildenhall, England, Feb. 14, 2018. Sixty U.S. Air Forces in Europe personnel from Stavanger, Norway; Aviano Air Base, Italy; Moron Air Base, Spain; and surrounding bases in the United Kingdom participated in this collaborative workshop. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Benjamin Cooper)

Christopher Poe, master resilience trainer contractor, calls on a student during the Master Resilience Training Course at RAF Mildenhall, England, Feb. 14, 2018. The MRTC trains people to be mentally stronger and better able to tap into their strengths to handle life’s challenges. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Benjamin Cooper)

Christopher Poe, master resilience trainer contractor, calls on a student during the Master Resilience Training Course at RAF Mildenhall, England, Feb. 14, 2018. The MRTC trains people to be mentally stronger and better able to tap into their strengths to handle life’s challenges. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Benjamin Cooper)

AJ Adams, master resilience trainer contractor, speaks with a student during one of the partner activities of the Master Resilience Trainer Course at RAF Mildenhall, England, Feb. 14, 2018. Student activities are vital elements of the course, and each module has multiple opportunities for the students to express their opinions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Benjamin Cooper)

AJ Adams, master resilience trainer contractor, speaks with a student during one of the partner activities of the Master Resilience Trainer Course at RAF Mildenhall, England, Feb. 14, 2018. Student activities are vital elements of the course, and each module has multiple opportunities for the students to express their opinions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Benjamin Cooper)

RAF MILDENHALL, England – Sixty service members and spouses from across Europe gathered together for the Master Resilience Trainer Course here, Feb. 12-16.

The course is designed to take students who have already become resilience trainer assistants and enhance their skills by learning about the scientific research supporting their techniques.

“We teach a core curriculum that is built to help make people stronger mentally,” said Terry Brazil, master resilience trainer contractor. “The services we provide are designed to help people fix challenges and problems by helping them tap into their strengths and be as effective as they can.”

The trainers provide the students with a deeper understanding of the core concepts so they can share the knowledge with their home units.

“Airmen are able to go back to their unit and do two things: first is to go forward and train, and second, act as ambassadors of the program and demonstrate their newfound skills,” Brazil explained. “That’s a critical piece because you can be an awesome trainer, but if you aren’t practicing the skills, people see that and they see right through it.”

Personnel from Stavanger, Norway; Aviano Air Base, Italy; Moron Air Base, Spain; and surrounding bases in the United Kingdom participated in this collaborative workshop.

“I wanted to become an MRT because I love to help people and to be of service to others,” said Staff Sgt. Genevieve Villela, 100th Comptroller Squadron NCO-in-charge of financial operations. “With this, I am learning skills to better myself as a person, as a supervisor and as a leader.”

The week-long training culminated with two days of student teach-back, where the students demonstrated to their teachers and the rest of the class what they learned.

“For us, the teach-backs are one of the most reinforcing parts of the curriculum and the week,” said Brazil. “We get to see how they’ve internalized what we have been talking about, and it’s a lot of fun to see people really shine.”

The course aims to help people deal more effectively with daily challenges so that when more difficult ones arise the MRTs are able to deal with them.

“This is not just about major adversities, it’s about life and the day-to-day hassles,” Brazil said. “We want students to gain perspective and get a deeper understanding of why we do some of the things we do.”

The class maintains a positive atmosphere, focusing on bettering the student’s ability to deal with stress.

“I think it’s a great opportunity and I would suggest if anyone has the opportunity to be an RTA or an MRT, definitely take it up. You meet a lot of good people, you learn skills and better yourself,” Villela said. “You learn skills for your job that you can utilize in your life or wherever you go.”