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BRITS BITS: 10 haunted places in UK to visit

The Tower of London is said to have no shortage of headless souls. Its history is a place of torture and imprisonment. Some of the tower’s best known victims were the princes who were allegedly murdered by their uncle, Richard III. Other victims include Lady Jane Grey, Anne Boleyn and the White Lady, whose supernatural signature is the overpowering aroma of cheap perfume — hinting at an unrecorded snobbery among the undead. (Courtesy photo by Capt. Laura Balch/Released)

The Tower of London is said to have no shortage of headless souls. Its history is a place of torture and imprisonment. Some of the tower’s best known victims were the princes who were allegedly murdered by their uncle, Richard III. Other victims include Lady Jane Grey, Anne Boleyn and the White Lady, whose supernatural signature is the overpowering aroma of cheap perfume — hinting at an unrecorded snobbery among the undead. (Courtesy photo by Capt. Laura Balch/Released)

Many people wonder what happens after this life. Whether you believe in ghosts or not, there are many places to visit in the U.K. that offer special “haunted” events and experiences on and around Halloween. For more information on pre-arranged trips to such places, contact the base Information, Tickets and Travel office at 01638-54-2630. (U.S. Air Force illustration by Gary Rogers/Released)

Many people wonder what happens after this life. Whether you believe in ghosts or not, there are many places to visit in the U.K. that offer special “haunted” events and experiences on and around Halloween. For more information on pre-arranged trips to such places, contact the base Information, Tickets and Travel office at 01638-54-2630. (U.S. Air Force illustration by Gary Rogers/Released)

RAF MILDENHALL, England -- Many people wonder what happens after this life. Whether you believe in ghosts or not, there are many places to visit in the U.K. that offer special "haunted" events and experiences on and around Halloween. For more information on pre-arranged trips to such places, contact the base Information, Tickets and Travel office at 01638-54-2630.

For those wanting to travel on their own and feel the hairs on the back on their neck stand up because of a distant, unexplained sound or an unexplainable movement out of the corner of their eye, these places may be worth a visit.

1. Borley Rectory, Essex. This is close to Mildenhall in the next county of Essex. Accounts of the rectory's ghouls, including a murdered nun, brought this place national infamy until its destruction by fire in 1939. It was completely demolished in 1944; however, its demolition has not diminished its status among supernatural enthusiasts.

www.britannia.com/history/legend/borley.html

2. The Tower of London. This place is said to have no shortage of headless souls. Its history is a place of torture and imprisonment. Some of the tower's best known victims were the princes who were allegedly murdered by their uncle, Richard III. The boys were the only sons of Edward IV alive at the time of his death. When the boys "disappeared," Richard took the throne for himself. The tower supposedly also plays host to the ghosts Lady Jane Grey, Anne Boleyn and the White Lady, whose supernatural signature is the overpowering aroma of cheap perfume -- hinting at an unrecorded snobbery among the undead.

www.visitlondon.com/things-to-do/place/22249-hm-tower-of-london

3. Highgate Cemetery, London. In the late 1960s, rumors began to circulate of a tall, dark figure whose hypnotic red eyes terrorized visitors to this spectacular gothic-style cemetery. With stories of mutilated animals and fearful schoolgirls, it wasn't long before tales of a vampire emerged.

www.visitlondon.com/things-to-do/place/149369-highgate-cemetery

4. The Red Lion, Avebury, Wiltshire. If the number of supposedly haunted U.K. public houses is anything to go by, then the British enjoy a tipple, or drink of alcohol, or two as much in the afterlife as when on earth. This public house is situated within Avebury's mysterious stone circle, long associated with witchcraft, paganism and superstition. Within the 400 year-old inn, there have been reports of orbs of light, ghostly children sightings, odd shadows and cold spots.

www.haunted-britain.com/red-lion-inn-avebury.htm

5. Berry Pomeroy Castle, near Totness, Devon. Visitors to this 12th century castle may catch a glimpse of the White Lady or the Blue Lady. The White Lady is said to be Margaret Pomeroy; she had the misfortune to fall in love with the same man as Lady Eleanor -- her less beautiful, but insanely jealous sister. Said to have been imprisoned by Lady Eleanor in the castle dungeons, it's from those underground rooms that her spirit is said to rise into the castle. The Blue Lady is said to be seen beckoning visitors among the ruins. Her origins are unknown.

www.english-heritage.org.uk/daysout/properties/berry-pomeroy-castle/

6. The Ancient Ram Inn, Wotton-under-Edge, Gloucester. Dating back from the 12th century and reportedly built on a pagan burial ground, this ramshackle building is not for the fainthearted. Activities supposedly taken place at this inn included Satanism, murder and human sacrifices.

www.hauntedrooms.co.uk/the-ancient-ram-inn-wotton-under-edge-gloucestershire

7. Llancaiach Fawr Manor, near Caerphilly. This place is a living museum, frozen in the year 1645. This Tudor manor house is often described as the most haunted in Wales. As well as the ubiquitous spectral children, some of the most noted paranormal activity is the constant chatter of disembodied voices around the house. One particular room is said to frequently cause visitors to burst into tears.

www.visitcardiff.com/things-to-do/llancaiach-fawr-manor-p9531

8. Culloden Moor, near Inverness. In 1746, the last battle fought on mainland Britain took place on this barren moor. An era of repression of the Highland customs and traditions began when the Jacobite rebellion was dealt a terminal blow when they lost at Culloden Moor. On the orders of the Duke of Cumberland, Jacobite prisoners were wounded and ruthlessly massacred. Each year on the battle's anniversary, April 16, the land is said to echo with the anguished cries of those killed.

www.countryfile.com/days-out/culloden-moor-inverness

9. Glamis Castle, Angus, Scotland. Supposedly riddled with secret rooms is the imposing home of the current Earl and Countess of Strathmore. Ghostly residents include a tongueless woman said to run around the gardens, the so-called Monster of Glamis Castle (an unkind name for a deformed child held at the castle in the 19th century) and an aristocrat lady who loudly complains about a lost card game. There is also the Grey Lady who is not the late Queen Mother, who was born at Glamis in 1900, but is said to be Janet Douglas, who was executed on a charge of witchcraft in 1537.

www.glamis-castle.co.uk/

10. Pendle Hill, Lancashire. The setting for Britain's most famous witch trial. Here, 10 of the so-called Pendle Witches were hanged at Lancaster Castle in 1612 and their ghosts reportedly haunt the site. The most haunted is said to be the village of Newchurch, lying in the shadows of Pendle Hill. The hill is said to be where one of the witches was buried.

www.visitlancashire.com/explore/pendle-hill

The historical romance and mystery of some of these places is mesmerizing. The British Isles is a relatively small island, so these places are only a drive away from RAF Mildenhall. Full of history and intrigue, they are a great day out, but visitors are warned to keep their wits about them!

(No federal endorsement is intended or implied for the places or websites listed above.)